Peaceful easy living around Lake Hodges

Located 31 miles away from downtown San Diego, the peaceful community of Lake Hodges feels like it's a world away. Thinking of moving to Lake Hodges? You'll find a peaceful easy lifestyle alongside a beautiful lake. There are a variety of rustic and luxury homes with view of Lake Hodges and the surrounding hills. As you drive along Del Dios Highway there's a beautiful view of the lake and its impressive dam, but it's easy to miss the unique neighborhood hidden beneath the canopy of trees along the lake's shore. With its beautiful lake and peaceful surroundings, the area of Lake Hodges is a hidden gem for the people that live here.

houes under canopy in Lake Hodges neighborhood
Driving along the highway above Lake Hodges, it's easy to miss the unique neighborhood hidden beneath the canopy of trees along the lake's shore. Unincorporated communities around Lake Hodges include Highlands West, Lake Hodges Hills, Quiet Hills, Felicita Park and Del Dios.


"People that live here enjoy the feeling of being away from the city," said Sue Scott Kluey a resident and Realtor who moved here in 1978. When she's not selling real estate, she enjoys taking photos of the natural beauty of this area. "It's quiet and peaceful here," Kluey said.

Real Estate In Lake Hodges Area

Homes in the area range from quaint older homes to large custom luxury homes. Home prices currently range from the mid-$700,000s to over $2 million.

Lake Hodges photos
LEFT: The lake offers a variety of recreational uses, including fishing, boating and trails for hiking, horseback riding and biking. RIGHT: More than 200 species of birds reside at or visit Lake Hodges each year. In 1999 through the efforts of the San Dieguito River Park and the Palomar Audubon Society, Lake Hodges was the first site in California to hold a ceremony formally recognizing it as a Globally Important Bird Area.

Location Offers A Quiet and Convenient Lifestyle

Lake Hodges is an unincorporated area of San Diego. The community lies east of 1-15, and skirts the north side of the lake along Via Rancho Parkway. Del Dios Highway is its western border. The lake offers a variety of recreational uses, including fishing, boating and trails for hiking, horseback riding and biking. Lake Hodges is a reservoir that supplies water to the San Dieguito Water District and Santa Fe Irrigation District. When full the reservoir has 27 miles of shoreline and a maximum depth of 115 feet. The dam was built in 1918.

Houses on hill above Lake Hodges
Homes on the surrounding hills enjoy panoramic views of the lake.

Hiking Trails

Around the lake there are trails that wind through a variety of terrain and biological settings including streams, marshes, oak forests, arid rocky areas and open fields. There are picnic areas where visitors can bring self-contained barbecues for use in designated areas only. Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times and at least 50 feet away from the water. A bicycle/pedestrian bridge spans the lake. The bridge is one of the longest stressed ribbon bridges in the world. On the south side of the lake there is a Native American cultural site with information about the Kumeyaay Indians.

Lake Hodges has been designated "A Globally Important Bird Area" by the National Audubon Society and the American Bird Conservancy. The area received this designation due to the large number of threatened California gnatcatchers that live in the coastal sage scrub surrounding the lake.

Cyclists at Lake Hodges
Cyclists and hikers take advantage miles of paths around Lake Hodges.

Fishing at Lake Hodges

Fishing is allowed and the lake from February through October. This is a great place to catch big largemouth bass. Other fish you might catch include bluegill, bullhead, carp and catfish. Fishing can be done by boat, kayaks, float tubes, or from the shore. Windsurfing is allowed from mid-April to mid-October. There is a concession where you can rent boats and get a fishing license, bait and refreshments. Currently closed, the concession is scheduled to reopen in February.

There is a mystery associated with the lake. Years ago some people claimed there was a strange creature living in the lake - something that might be a cousin to Nessy, the Lock Ness Monster. Residents called this creature "Hodgee." In 1929, Scripps Institute of Oceanography was hired to investigate, but was not able to verify the existence of Hodgee.

Besides the lake concession and boat rentals, there are no businesses here. There is one restaurant, Hernadez' Hideaway. All shopping conveniences are minutes away in Escondido.

Lake Hodges dam
The Lake Hodges Dam was completed in 1918 and supplies water to the San Dieguito and Santa Fe Irrigation water districts.

Lake Hodges has been designated "A Globally Important Bird Area" by the National Audubon Society and the American Bird Conservancy. The area received this designation due to the large number of threatened California gnatcatchers that live in the coastal sage scrub surrounding the lake.

Historic Bridge - living in Lake Hodges

This "Stressed Ribbon" is the longest of its kind in the world. It was originally part of Hwy. 395. Today it is strictly for pedestrians. It offers great views of the lake and when the water is high you can see huge catfish swimming around. When the water is low there are lots of different birds and animals to see..

Copyright 2015 TownBlip.


 


 


map link - Lake Hodges

PARKS

Hodges Reservoir

Kit Carson Park
3333 Bear Valley Pkwy.
Escondido, CA 92025



SCHOOLS


HIGH SCHOOLS

Center City High School
240 South Maple St.
Escondido, CA

Escondido High School
1535 North Broadway
Escondido



MIDDLE SCHOOLS


Del Dios Middle School
1400 West 9th Ave.
Escondido

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Bernardo Elementary
1122 Mountain Heights Dr.

Miller Elementary
1975 Miller Ave.

rule

SUBMIT photos and information about this neighborhood to
townblip@yahoo.com



Lake Hodges neighborhood profile blip
Hernandez Hideaway
NEARBY: Escondido Rancho Bernardo Ramona
Vista San Marcos Poway
More communities
HOMEruleABOUTruleCONTACTruleADVERTISE

Lake Hodges Dam overflowing to a snappy banjo tune
YouTube